Difficult roads – do they really matter?

Recently, I came across a quote from Melchor Lim:

“Difficult roads often lead to beautiful destinations.” ~ Melchor Lim

This quote is motivating because it tells you that your present situation may be difficult but your destination will be more satisfactory and fulfilling.

This quote can help build a person’s confidence.

But here’s an observation: recently I went to North India Countryside and I took the following picture – of a beautiful road.

Difficult roads often lead to beautiful destinations

The journey observed beautiful roads and also led us to beautiful destinations!

So I thought about the quote a bit more and I realized that:

Your destination would depend on what you make of your journey. Tough roads, easy roads, beautiful roads, pleasant moments, frustrating situations … all will come, but they would matter less if you have certain thought process to deal with them.

Such a thought process would start with the following critical question: why an external anything has any “control” over your feelings?

As a traveler, YOU matter more to your future, not the roads.

As a traveler, YOU matter more to your future, not the roads. #travel Click To Tweet

YOU matter because you’re the traveler. You’re the action-taker. You make things happen, not the roads. When the roads don’t make things happen, they are powerless. The one who makes thing happen is powerful, and that’s YOU!

So regardless of the type of the road, difficult or easy, ugly or beautiful, you will reach your beautiful destination if you choose to do so.

Go, reach your destination no matter what. Not because the road is beautiful, but because you choose to!

The hacker acumen – a digital zen story

Consider the story of Leo, a lifelong hacker:

The Hacker Acumen

Leo has been serving one of the oldest technology organizations in the world for past 30 years.

Leo was a self-taught programmer who led his way to a multinational tech organization via acquisition of his own tech security services company.

Leo had used punch cards. Worked with age-old technologies such as Fortran, Cobol, Basic and C/C++, watched email being invented, coded business apps with Xbase languages such as Clipper, saw the PC market being taken over by Microsoft in mid-nineties and also saw Apple being the world’s most valuable company in the past decade surpassing the PC era.

Even in his fifties, Leo lived a geeky life. Several years ago his wife passed away. His children found their way in their own lives and here was Leo, alone yet peaceful and content with what he’s been doing with his life.

One Saturday night, he was spending some time working on a complex algorithm in his home office.

He saw an abnormal activity in one of the backup servers he was monitoring.  A hacker was trying to get into the server and get access to the code but was not able to.

Leo’s home backup server hosted the legacy code of an Operating System he had developed long ago.

Experienced Leo soon caught the hacker, “You’ve been trying so hard to break into my backup server,” he told the hacker, “and you should not return empty-handed. Please take the source code of the operating system I built long ago as a gift.”

The hacker was puzzled. He took the source code and went offline.

hacker-accumen

Leo sat on the floor, reflecting about hacking. “Poor guy,” he mused, “I wish I could give him my ‘Hacker Acumen’ to him, which means to create and learn, not to steal.”

My Takeaways

  1. Hacking does not mean breaching the security of systems; it means being a creator…a lifelong learner.
  2. If you commit to the work of your life then you don’t worry about spending your time at work. Even you’re at home, you create your workplace. You do it for a simple reason: it is no longer just your work, it’s your life!
  3. Source code has no value in the word of a competent hacker.  I remember when I was worried about “protecting” the source code of the Business Apps I was building in early 2000. Fast forward to 15 years and it has never helped me. I mean having a “copy” of the source code just gives mental relief that you have something, but in the real world, if you know what you’re doing, you’ll easily create new source code without any hassle. And if you’re not competent, it doesn’t matter much.
  4. Just trying to crack into someone’s server does not make you a hacker. A hacker has a ‘Hacker Acumen’,  a mindset of continuous exploring, trying, failing and learning.
  5. Get absolutely clear about hacking: Real hackers solve problems and build things, and they believe in freedom and voluntary mutual help; So-called hackers (Crackers) break them. Decide which kind of hacker you want to be.
Real hackers solve problems and build things; crackers break them. Choose to be a #hacker. Click To Tweet

Be a Real Hacker, Be Like Leo

be-a-hacker :: be-like-leo

This is Leo.

Leo is a hacker.

Leo spends a lot of time building things. Leo is crazy. Leo does not hack to break any system’s security. Leo hacks to help.

Leo has a real hacker acumen.

Be like Leo!